void tRrLM();++ //Void Terrarium++ Review: PS5

This is one void you won’t want to avoid.

Mystery Dungeon” is a phrase that most gamers likely associate with the Pokemon series. These highly-emotive spinoffs are critically acclaimed by fans for their combination of entrancing narrative with randomised dungeon-crawling gameplay. Though the term has become synonymous with the Nintendo franchise since popular titles like Red/Blue Rescue Team and Explorers of Darkness/Time/Sky, its origins stem from a genre of games that predates Pokemon by several years.

Pokemon Mystery Dungeon Explorers of Sky
Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Sky (Nintendo DS, 2009)

Pioneered by Chunsoft, the series was conceptualised as a Dragon Quest IV spinoff known as Torneko’s Great Adventure: Mystery Dungeon, released in 1993 exclusive to the Super Famicom in Japan. Playing as the game’s money-hungry merchant, Torneko (known also as Taloon in Western releases), the player is tasked with exploring randomly-generated dungeons to find valuable items to expand your store and fend off monsters that might hinder your progress. A reliance on randomisation and challenging difficulty created a roguelike genre now widely recognised as the Mystery Dungeon.

Shiren the Wanderer Switch
Shiren the Wanderer: The Tower of Fortune and the Dice of Fate (Nintendo Switch, 2020)

Series like Final Fantasy, Etrian Odyssey, and most notably Pokemon joined in with popular Mystery Dungeon spin-offs. An original IP known as Shiren the Wanderer was even created from the ground up as a game focused entirely on this style on gameplay and now spans multiple entries from the Gameboy to the Nintendo Switch. Now almost 30 years since its inception, a new Mystery Dungeon title emerges, seeking to fill a void in the dormant subgenre: Void Terrarium.

Originally released on the PlayStation 4 and Nintendo Switch, this new title from NIS America (who somehow manage to pump out obscure JRPGs at an alarming rate!) has made its way onto PlayStation 5 in the upgraded ++ version. So is this roguelike worth your time, or should it be avoided at all costs? Read on and find out!

Story

Civilisation has collapsed. Humanity is on the brink of extinction. The world has fallen under the grasp of a highly-contagious toxic fungus that infects every living organism. In a desolate scrapyard nestled deep in the underground ruins, a lone robot awakens. Trudging through the barren wastes now long abandoned by humans, the robot stumbles across a dormant figure, a young girl asleep on a bed of fungi: Toriko.

Void Terrarium PS5 Toriko Robbie
A fungus among us.

In a comatose state with mushrooms protruding from her body, the robot focuses its entire efforts on revitalising the weakened girl and nursing her back to health. A goal that could possibly lead to the restoration of humanity. However, the harsh environment will not make this easy. Even the very air Toriko breathes is a toxic fume, slowly depleting her life. To protect the girl, the Robot must create a safe haven in which she can finally recover: a Terrarium.

With the help of a discarded CRT display known as the FactoryAI who acts as your guide, Robbie ventures into the wasteland to retrieve items to construct the terrarium and allow Toriko to survive. This bleak post-apocalyptic setting conveys a melancholy narrative of despair, tragedy, and against all odds, hope. Playing as the robot, affectionally named Robbie, the fate of humanity rests upon your cold shoulders.

Void Terrarium PS5 FactoryAI
FactoryAI is super cute and helps to motivate you.

Gameplay

Ever played a mystery dungeon game? Well, if you have, you’re going to LOVE the gameplay on offer in Void Terrarium, as it will feel immediately familiar. All the staples of the genre are here: randomised locations consisting of numerous levels, punishing roguelike difficulty, and a massive pool of items, abilities and upgrades to keep every run fresh. The only difference is you play solely as Robbie, so there’s no backup when things get tough; it’s all up to you.

The main task of the game is to obtain items to construct the terrarium, all of which are found deep within isolated locations of the wasteland. You’ll be given a short briefing as to where the desired item is located before you’re dropped into the dungeon on your lonesome. Starting at level 1 at the beginning of each area, you’ll need to defeat enemies in turn-based combat to progress your stats, unlock new skills, and have more of a chance of making it to the end goal.

Void Terrarium PS5 dungeon
Most of your time will be spent exploring the randomised dungeons.

Exploration and combat is simple and takes place on a grid, and enemies can be defeated through various means: normal attacks, skills, weapons, and items (like grenades or bombs). Areas will become increasingly difficult as you progress, requiring you to unlock permanent upgrades to improve your chances to delve deeper. It’s an incredibly satisfying gameplay loop that had me returning time and time again, as I told myself “just one more run!” before I inevitably forced myself to go to bed. Each playthrough will unlock new items that can be constructed to furnish the Terrarium and in turn provide minor permanent stat boosts or skills that can be equipped.

Void Terrarium PS5 abilities
You’ll unlock new abilities and stat boosts as you level up.

That sounds pretty simple so far. Just exploration and combat. Easy, right? Not quite.

Robbie is a robot, and doing as robots will do, they run off electricity. Every movement, attack and skill within the wasteland consumes energy which is displayed on the screen. Run out of energy and you’re pretty much done for. This must be closely monitored and recharged by picking up batteries that are dropped at random by foes, or through use of particular unlockable skills. Batteries can be scarce and will force you to manage your energy wisely.

To complicate things further, Robbie must also look after Toriko at all times. Through the use of the Pet Nanny (a Tamagotchi-like device), Toriko’s hunger, health status, boredom, and even toileting habits must be closely monitored and managed accordingly. If she falls ill while out in the wastes, you’ll need to head back immediately to prevent her imminent demise. This becomes incredibly tense when you’re towards the end of a gruelling dungeon only to hear the tone of the Pet Nanny alert you to return to Toriko’s side. It definitely adds deeper complexity to the game’s exploration as you micromanage not only your own, but also Toriko’s wellbeing.

Void Terrarium PS5 Toriko Petnanny
I recommend not letting the Pet Nanny get to this state.

Visuals

When booting up the game, don’t be lured into a false sense of aesthetic wonderment. The 2D hub world looks absolutely gorgeous, there’s no doubt about that. Beautiful hand drawn art, vibrant, lush greens upon a dark, bleak background all set the mood of the game. Even the attention to detail of the terrarium in which Toriko is contained is impressive and beautiful to observe. Sadly, this is not at all representative of the rest of the game’s visuals.

Void Terrarium PS5 Art
The Terrarium becomes visually captivating once new items are crafted.

Once you’re exploring the dungeons, visuals become basic, bland, and feel mostly uninspired and repetitive. It works for the style of the gameplay, as it helps to visualise where Robbie and other enemies are placed on the grid and the map, but this is not a PlayStation 5 title that you’ll be playing for its graphics by any means. There’s a stark contrast when you return to the hub world to be again greeted by the gorgeous, eerie aesthetic. It would have been brilliant to see some of the art-style somehow incorporated into the dungeon crawling gameplay.

Audio

Where the game’s visuals at times feel bland and repetitive, the soundtrack by Hajime Sugie manages to create a soundscape that feels perfectly crafted for the game’s setting. In a score that is primarily electronic (how appropriate), Sugie utilises ambient tones and robotic noises of beeps and glitches to craft a unique style that is both melancholic and entrancing. I’d happily listen to the Terrarium theme for hours on loop (in fact, I probably did, as I put about 30+ hours into the game, several of which were spent in the Terrarium).

The dungeon music, though repetitive, fits perfectly with the style of each area. A swampy wasteland sounds completely different to infected warehouse sounds completely different to a robotic factory. It’s impressive how music like this can manage to reflect the game’s visuals almost better than the visuals themselves. An impressive accomplishment for the composer!

Extras

Completionists are going to have a ball with this one. As you progress through the dungeons, you’ll unlock various blueprints for items that can be taken back to the Terrarium and crafted. These consist of furniture and decorations for the Terrarium, clothing and accessories for Toriko, and skills and unique modules that can be applied to Robbie. There’s enough unlockables to keep even the most avid collectors occupied for 40 – 50+ hours of gameplay.

Void Terrarium PS5 unlockable furniture
Why craft a Wooden Stool when you can sit on a perfectly good rock?

Outside of the main story, dungeons and collectibles, there’s not much else to keep you coming back for more. Towards the end of the game you’ll be given access to an endless dungeon that will allow easier procurement of items, but it doesn’t quite offer the infinite gameplay of many other roguelikes.

Conclusion

Going into Void Terrarium, I had no idea what to expect of the game, and throughout my 30+ hour journey into the fungal wastelands, I’ve been convinced that this is a sleeper hit. Simple yet addictive gameplay with satisfying micromanagement, numerous upgrades, and a compelling story make this one of the best Mystery Dungeon games I’ve encountered. Fans of Pokemon Mystery Dungeon or roguelikes in general should do themselves a favour and dive into the infected wastes – as gross as that sounds, I guarantee you’re going to enjoy it.

So, why should you play it?

  • You’ve previously played and enjoyed other Mystery Dungeon games.
  • The randomised gameplay of roguelikes appeals to you.
  • Enjoy Tamagotchis? Well this game has one!
  • Plenty of items and abilities mean no two playthroughs are the same.

But why shouldn’t you play it?

  • Can’t stand repetitive gameplay? This game isn’t for you.
  • Retro-style grid-based exploration/combat likely won’t appeal to those wanting a modern game.

A review code for PlayStation 5 was provided for the purpose of this review.

Maid of Sker Review: PS5

Will you answer the Siren’s call?

There is a new survival horror game out on PS5 this month (well, a newish next-gen upgraded version of the game anyway), and I’m not talking about Resident Evil. Maid of Sker was previously released by Wales Interactive for the PC, PS4 and Xbox One in 2020, and has received the next-gen upgrade treatment for PS5 and Xbox Series consoles. Can the small Indie developer known for trying to bring back the ‘FMV’ style of game (baaaaaad idea) find some success with a game in a more mainstream genre? Read on my friends, read on…

Plot

The story of Maid of Sker bears little resemblance to the original Welsh folk song (or the novel of the same name). The game is set in 1898 in Wales and we embody Thomas, a silent protagonist (unless you consider grunts and screams as speaking). He is sent a letter by his lady friend Elisabeth along with her mother’s musical locket. Elisabeth requests that Thomas write a song, indeed a ‘counter song’ to the melody played by the locket (whatever that is), and to bring his music to her in the Sker Hotel managed by her father. Unfortunately, she cannot provide any further detail in her letter…how convenient.

Maid of Sker PS5 PlayStation 5
Welcome to Silent H… I mean the house of Lady Dime… I mean the Sker Hotel.

Thomas of course obliges to Elisabeth’s request and rushes to the hotel via train. On arrival, Thomas is greeted not by a thankful Elisabeth, but by a ringing telephone in the lobby of a dilapidated hotel filled with crazy cult members. Upon answering the phone, Thomas is pleased to hear that Elisabeth is on the other end of the line. She explains that she has barricaded herself in the attic to protect herself from her father, her uncle, and the strange people now inhabiting the hotel. She tasks Thomas with locating four musical cylinders hidden throughout the hotel that if played on the organ/harmonium in the hotel ballroom will turn everything back to normal. What is it that needs to be turned back to normal you ask? The ‘Quiet Ones‘ – staff and guests of the hotel that have been driven insane. They roam the grounds with sacks over their heads, viciously attacking anything that makes a sound.

Maid of Sker PS5 PlayStation 5
Play me a song my darling Elisabeth.

Thomas is generally left to his own devices to complete the game’s quest and other than some brief phone conversations with Elisabeth there are no other verbal interactions of which to speak. However, there are a number of clues scattered around the hotel in journals and on scraps of paper that provide further plot exposition. Elisabeth’s family has been part of a cult for generations, after her ancestors appear to have encountered the mythical Siren out in the open sea when sailing back to Wales. What was it about the Siren’s song that was so alluring?

Gameplay

The main story mode of Maid of Sker can be best described as a survival/stealth horror game. We control Thomas from a 1st person perspective as he skulks around the hotel finding clues, solving puzzles and picking up the musical cylinders without being discovered by the Quiet Ones. Fortunately, the Quiet Ones wear sacks over their heads and are for all intents and purposes blind. They can only locate you when you are silly enough to bump into furniture or try to walk through a dust cloud and cough your lungs out when they are in earshot. Unfortunately, in what may be a frustrating choice for some players, for the majority of the game we are literally defenseless. Even when the game is nice enough to provide a ‘weapon,’ this can only be used to temporarily stun enemies and cannot kill them, and in typical style the ammo for this weapon is extremely limited. More frustratingly, there is a point when this weapon is simply taken away from you for the rest of the game.

Maid of Sker PS5 PlayStation 5
How do you know I’m standing here? Oh, I forgot deodorant this morning you say? It is only 1898 after all.

Whilst I must admit to finding this complete lack of any offensive power incredibly frustrating in the early going, by the later game it does provide you with some tense moments. Thomas does control well enough, and there were never any moments where I felt a death in the game was caused by anything other than my own poor choices.

The puzzles in the game are all intuitive enough to solve without needing to look up a guide, and there are typically ample clues around to help you if you get stuck. In truth I would have liked a bit more variety in the puzzles here, and there is nothing ground-breaking that you haven’t seen done in similar games elsewhere. Find item X to open secret passageway Y that leads you to key Z etc. etc. That being said, the offering here is solid and if you like this style of game, then it is an enjoyable way to pass some time.

I must point out that the main story is relatively short even for survival horror, and can be completed in about 4-6 hours (more if you want to find all of the collectable items and uncover the full backstory). Originally released as an Indie title by Wales Interactive for the PC, PS4 and Xbox One in 2020, the team have gone above and beyond in providing something new for this next-gen upgrade with a collection of completely new game modes.

These 4 modes whilst all somewhat similar in their goal (escape the hotel with a limited number of lives/deaths) and do show that the game developers listened to some of the complaints of the original game. The two main differences in these additional ‘Challenges’ as they are called are:

  1. You now have access to 4 different weapons (Axe, Handgun, Shotgun, Rifle).
  2. There are a number of different enemy types that you need to mow down on your way out of the hotel.

The new experiences do give you that feeling of power that you severely miss in the main story and are worth a bit more of your time. But they probably won’t be something that significantly extends your time with the game as the FPS style controls and gameplay are just not up to par with dedicated FPS games.

Certainly my favourite element of the gameplay is the way that music and sound are utilised throughout the adventure. The crescendoing shrieks of a dissonant string orchestra will warn you of danger nearby. Alternatively, a simple change in the background music to a music box tune will alert you to an important item or save point nearby. What is that you hear? The rattle of a key turning a lock in the distance? You go to investigate… you have now opened the door to the next section of the review.

Presentation

Presentation is both a strength and a weakness of Maid of Sker. On the negative side, and as we might reasonably expect from an indie title with a small development team, the visuals here are rough around the edges. This was a late generation PS4 game, but it really wouldn’t look out of place on a PS3 when you compare it to the big AAA games on that platform (think Last of Us and Uncharted 3). Similarly to the lack of variety in the gameplay, there is also a similar deficiency here. The one main type of enemy is very bland looking and their animation is a bit janky, and the main boss is not much better.

Maid of Sker PS5 PlayStation 5

That being said, there has clearly been a lot of care and attention to detail here in regards to the environmental details here such as the trimmings of the hotel, the art on the walls and the furniture strewn around the rooms. There are a number of brief/small set-pieces that made me stop and say ‘that was sick‘ (in a good way), whereas other moments seem to fall flat, or almost appear comical in nature due to the animation. Despite the game’s clear limitations in terms of visuals, the gritty, dark Sker Hotel and surrounding grounds provide a great atmosphere particularly when combined with the aforementioned best element of the game – the sound design.

Audio

I was blown away by the quality of the sound and music in this game. It is by no means perfect, but clearly sound design is the highlight of the Maid of Sker experience. Given that ‘music’ is a core aspect of the game’s story and gameplay, it is obvious that the developers really put some effort in to this part of the game. The soundtrack is haunting and the perfect fit to this game, particularly in the build up to the game’s finale. Sound effects are also generally good, but can occasionally be a little more miss than hit, for example some of Thomas’ falling/death screams seeming more funny/hilarious than scary. Thomas is silent throughout the game other than his breathing, screaming and yelling. Elisabeth, however, is fully voiced during the numerous phone calls with her, and the Gramophones that are used as this game’s save point (like the Typewriter in Resident Evil) will also play a recorded voice clip of Elisabeth and her family.

Maid of Sker PS5 PlayStation 5
If the screech of this device upsets you, wait until you hear me falling.

Some PS5 features also helped improve the experience such as the fast loading times and the utilisation of the Dual Sense controller’s haptic feedback. Thomas’ heart rate will increase and become stronger depending on the situation he finds himself. It is subtle but again helps build on the game’s strong atmosphere and overall experience.

Conclusion

Maid of Sker was made by a small core team of less than 15 people, and at times it does show. As noted above, the base game is very short for a modern game. Even in this game’s genre, this one feels a little bit short for me. This may be as a result of the repetitiveness in the enemies and the puzzles.

That being said, the atmosphere that is built though the soundscape of this game is excellent. You can feel the pressure and tension of sneaking past groups of enemies, and the relief of snatching the item that you need to progress without being found.

There is nothing here that can be considered broken or otherwise gamebreaking. The game is a solid package and everything works. I played through the full story and multiple attempts at the challenge content and did not come across any bugs or crashes on PS5. Maid of Sker can’t compete at the level of a game like Resident Evil: Village – but we have to accept that a AAA game would have had at least 10 times the number of staff working on the game as Maid of Sker.

For what it is Maid of Sker is an enjoyable, if not short, experience that provides an intriguing story, a creepy atmosphere with some occasional jump scares and a cracking soundtrack.

So, why should you play it?

  • You are a survival/horror buff and want to experience a different and unique story.
  • Zombies, Vampires and other common horror tropes bore you and you want something more.
  • Not much time to play? No worries with this, you can get through it easily without too much of a time sink.

But, why shouldn’t you play it?

  • BOO! (did that scare you?)
  • You prefer a game that you can engage with for a long period of time.

A review code on PlayStation 5 was provided for the purpose of this review.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster Review: PS4/PS5

Reawaken your inner demon in this cult classic devilish JRPG, resurrected from the depths of hell.

When speaking about the JRPG genre, few series have gained notoriety in recent years as much as Persona. This massively popular series from Japanese developers, Atlus, has become an easily-recognizable staple of modern gaming thanks to its stylish anime visuals, catchy soundtracks, and colourful casts of characters. Though unbeknownst to many Persona fans, these games themselves are spin-offs of much a larger series, with roots deeply intertwined within the dark, devil-summoning origins of Megami Tensei.

Making its debut in 1987 for PC and NES exclusively in Japan, Digital Devil Story: Megami Tensei introduced a role-playing experience full of mature themes and grim undertones. Unlike most other light-hearted RPGs, which were primarily focused on traditional fantasy, this series had the player making deals alongside devils and demons in a hopeless and often depressing setting. Although popular in Japan, the series raised much controversy due to its mature content, distressing themes, and use of religious characters and imagery, making localization challenging.

Megami Tensei NES
The original Megami Tensei on NES.

This was until Nocturne.

The first mainline Shin Megami Tensei game to be released outside of Japan, Shin Megami Tensei III: Nocturne originally launched in 2003 on the PlayStation 2, the following year in the US, and 2005 in Europe as a “director’s cut” version titled Shin Megami Tensei: Lucifer’s Call. Despite remaining very much a niche JRPG, the game managed to receive overwhelmingly-positive reviews and cemented the series within a Western audience. Since then, numerous other Megami Tensei games have seen international releases across multiple console generations.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne PS2
Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne on PlayStation 2.

Now over 15 years since its release, Nocturne, much like the post-apocalyptic Tokyo in which it is set, has been born again and revived in a brand new HD Remaster for PlayStation 4 and Nintendo Switch. Though this begs the question: has this cult classic stood the test of time, or has it been outdone by the Persona series for which it is responsible?

Plot

All good JRPGs are set in Tokyo. That’s exactly where Nocturne begins: in the sprawling metropolis that is the heart of Japan. Playing as an unnamed silent protagonist, the story begins as a regular day in the city when tasked to meet up with fellow classmates and visit his school teacher in hospital. The hospital however is eerily quiet and the teacher is nowhere to be found – instead a mysterious figure attempts to take the protagonist’s life. It’s soon revealed that all those within the hospital are to be spared from the impending “Conception”: the destruction and rebirth of the world, which will annihilate all life and rebuild anew.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster PS5
If your hospital looks like this, maybe find another hospital.

Having conveniently survived the apocalypse, the player is beckoned by an unholy voice and infused with the power of demons: a Magatama. Undergoing changes even more confronting than those of puberty, the protagonist is forcibly morphed into an accursed “Demi-Fiend“, a forsaken being neither human nor demon. The newfound powers of the Magatama allow the protagonist not only to communicate with demons, but to recruit them to his bidding (a key gameplay element of the series).

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster PS5
Sick tatts, Demi-Fiend.

Upon leaving the hospital, Tokyo now lays in complete ruins, having been reconstructed into a spherical “Vortex World” where the majority of the game takes place. Now occupied by two opposing demonic cults, The Mantra Army and The Assembly of Nihilo, these warring factions seek to take control of the Vortex World and rebuild it as their own creation. This can be only be achieved through the manipulation of Magatsuhi (a term you’re going to hear a LOT in Nocturne), the life essence extracted from the suffering of living beings, particularly a race of disturbing artificial humans known as the Mannikins.

Though ultimately it comes down to the Demi-Fiend to decide whose pursuit to rebuild the world may succeed. In discovering new areas of the Vortex World and recruiting demons for your cause, it falls upon you to unravel the motives of each cult and their leaders, and oversee the fate of all who are left within this post-apocalyptic demonic dystopia. It’s a bleak, morbid, and often depressing narrative that is absolutely gripping from start to finish.

Gameplay

Nocturne is very much a traditional JRPG, and features most of the gameplay staples that you would come to expect of the genre, which is divided into several key elements: exploration, dungeons full of clever environmental puzzles, intuitive combat, and character/party customisation.

The Vortex World acts as an overworld hub, which represents Tokyo and is split into areas based on each real-life suburb. Having been to Tokyo multiple times I found it quite amusing to stumble across places that I recognised (though in a dilapidated state). Traversing this overworld as a simple icon allows you to enter more detailed locations, dungeons and labyrinths, where the majority of the game takes place. Most dungeons feature brilliant designs making exploration thoroughly enjoyable, and include puzzles to hinder your progress which will at times require some serious thought.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster PS5
I don’t remember seeing this in Tokyo.

Exploration is made even more satisfying with the souls of the deceased and disturbing demons also scattered throughout the new world. These offer hilarious dialogue in between the plot details obtained by conversing with them. Also featured is a quick travel system known as the Amala Network, where you travel via mystical steel drums that are linked together by some sort of satanic internet.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster PS5
I guess it’s like a demonic internet modem?

Those who have played Persona will be immediately familiar with many aspects of the combat, as the summoning and fusion of Persona is directly inspired by the demon summoning found within Nocturne. During battle you play solely as the Demi-Fiend but possess the ability to recruit and summon up to three different demons to fight alongside you in combat, each of whom offer a unique skillset. Demons can be recruited during combat by talking to them, offering up items as a sacrifice, or sometimes even seducing them.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster PS5
Some demons even run shops, like everyone’s favourite, Jack Frost, ho!

Outside of combat, party customisation comes in the form of swapping demons to/from the player’s stock, which expands with progression through the game. Stopping by the Cathedral of Shadows will also allow the registration and fusion of demons, creating stronger compatriots that cannot be obtained elsewhere. This element of gameplay is akin to the iconic “Velvet Room“, which provides the same service in the Persona series.

However, in a disturbingly un-RPG fashion, there is no equipment in the entire game. No weapons, armour, or even accessories. This is completely replaced by the Magatama: spiritual stones which are acquired throughout the game. By swapping Magatama, the Demi-Fiend’s stats will change and grow differently upon levelling up, providing varying skills that can be chosen and swapped out based on a particular play style. At first it was jarring not to have typical RPG equipment, but eventually I became accustomed to the Magatama which is a simple and satisfying system.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster PS5
Magatamas: gotta ingest ’em all.

Visuals

Those spoiled by the incredibly stylish visuals of Persona 5 may have a hard time stepping back into a visual style like Nocturne, which in comparison appears very rough around the edges. Despite being a “HD Remaster,” it’s still immediately obvious that Nocturne is a PlayStation 2 game. The cel-shaded 3D graphics almost seem to scream the early 2000s era. But is this a bad thing? Not quite. Technical limitations of the era meant that graphical fidelity instead had to be enhanced by artistic direction and clever design.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster PS5
An abandoned school, one of the more atmospheric areas in the game.

Despite the lack of detail when compared to modern JRPGs, Nocturne manages to create a setting and atmosphere that is equal parts intriguing and disturbing. This is achieved through distinct environments that are often eye-catching and key characters/NPCs that blend modern Japanese society with a hint of the macabre.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster PS5
Shibuya Scramble Crossing looking a bit empty.

Soundtrack/Audio

Shoji Meguro – maybe you’ve heard the name? Atlus’ in-house composer has been creating music for the series since the mid ’90s and has since become one of the most praised creators of videogame music. Known for his use of electronic, rock and jazz genres within the SMT/Persona series, Nocturne is a prime example of Meguro’s distinct musical style. Tracks vary from ambient and eerie through to frantic and fast-paced with everything in-between. It’s not quite the peppy J-Pop or acid jazz that has since become synonymous with Meguro, but it’s representative of his earlier creations and features tracks that fit with the melancholy and depressing nature of Nocturne. Check out the track “Tokyo Conception” for one of the more dramatic pieces in the game.

To accompany the soundtrack, a cast of characters ranging from delightfully devilish to downright demonic demonstrate voice acting performances that are some of the best from the PS2 era. The acting can be tense, genuine or convey legitimate emotion, and at times it can be comedic and cheesey (particularly some of the lines delivered by demons). Most importantly, it is at all times entertaining. The HD Remaster also now includes the option to swap between the original Japanese voice acting and the English dub which is a nice touch! My only complaint is that I wish there were more of it – we’ve become spoiled by modern games with full voice acting.

Extras

Nocturne and the Shin Megami Tensei series as a whole have gained a reputation for notorious difficulty. Though at times this can certainly be the case, the HD Remaster now offers a Merciful difficulty which caters to those simply wanting to enjoy the story with minimal challenge. Absolute masochists may even get a kick out of a fiendish hard mode (which I wouldn’t dare touch). This can be changed at any time and helps to make the game far more accessible for a wider audience. Throughout the game I found myself comfortably playing at the standard difficulty, though I did on occasion drop it down to Merciful to avoid frustration or tiresome grinding.

One of the other notable extras in the game is an block puzzle minigame that is thankfully completely optional. It’s reminiscent of early DOS games like Chip’s Challenge and has 20 levels of block-pushing madness that steadily increase in difficulty. After attempting to complete this and failing miserably, I have incredible respect for anyone who manages to finish all levels without the use of a walkthrough. I’d argue it’s tougher than the game itself.

Shin Megami Tensei III Nocturne HD Remaster PS5
I’ll be happy to never see this again.

Conclusion

Not only is this one of the finest JRPGs available on the PlayStation 2, but it’s an excellent entry point for exploring more of the Shin Megami Tensei series, especially for fans who have only been exposed to Persona. Now made more accessible thanks to the HD Remaster, anyone with a PlayStation 4/5 or Nintendo Switch has no excuse to try out this cult classic. Once you look past elements of the game that are now quite dated, you’ll experience an enthralling JRPG that is almost singlehandedly responsible for all other Atlus titles in the West that have followed it.

My recommendation? Don’t sleep on Nocturne.

So, why should you play it?

  • You’d call yourself a fan of the Persona games.
  • Never played any of the previous Shin Megami Tensei games? This is the perfect entry point.
  • Looking for a gripping, JRPG full of dark, mature themes? Look no further.
  • Plenty of difficulty options for those who might have previously struggled.
  • Featuring Dante from the Devil May Cry series.

But why shouldn’t you play it?

  • Played the original to completion? You might give the HD Remaster a pass then.
  • Enjoy upbeat, happy games? Stay well away from Nocturne.

A PlayStation 4 review copy was provided for the purpose of this review. The game was played on PlayStation 5.

Judgement Review: PlayStation 5

In the Japanese criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups: The detectives who investigate crime, and the lawyers who prosecute the offenders.

Actually, in this case it is just one man.

This is his story _DUN DUN_

The Yakuza series is a mainstay of the PlayStation library. The first title was released in Japan way back in 2005 for the PlayStation 2. Since that time a total of 8 main-line games and 3 spin-off titles made by Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio have been released outside of Japan with even more spin-off games available in Japan only. Initially the series could only be found on the PlayStation console family but now all of the titles can be found on Xbox/Windows as well.

There is a lot of convoluted history and backstory in the main Yakuza series, and with even the ‘shortest’ game in the series typically taking 20+ hours for a first playthrough. It can be a bit daunting for new players to just jump in to a Yakuza game. However, the spin-offs and Judgement in particular, are the perfect opportunity to get a feel for the setting, gameplay and storytelling that the made the Yakuza games so popular. 

Yakuza Series PS4 PS5
The main Yakuza series is a story that spans across multiple games.

Judgement does not have any characters returning from the main series and I believe this helps the game come across as fresh and allows it to maintain an individual identity despite the setting itself being very familiar. It also allows newcomers to fully enjoy the game without needing to play through 200+ hours of previous Yakuza games. So, what is Judgement actually about?

PLOT

Judgement is set in the Yakuza series’ staple fictional district of Kamurocho in Tokyo, Japan. Kamurocho doesn’t actually exist, but is based on the real-world red-light district of Kabukicho. Here we take the role of lawyer-come-private-detective Takayuki Yagami, using his full skillset from both occupations to solve a serial murder case involving the warring Yakuza clans that reside in Kamurocho. Early on in Judgement we are presented with Yagami’s tragic backstory that explains his decision to leave the uptight legal profession and become a cool, leather jacket-wearing private detective.

After the prologue we get started with Yagami taking on the investigation of a death in the ranks of Kamurocho’s Yakuza. This is the third Yakuza death with a heinous modus operandi involving removal of the eyes with an ice pick. Initially, Yagami is hired by the Tojo Clan to find evidence to exonerate a clan Captain of the latest murder. Through his investigations, Yagami discovers something much more sinister at play. The plot is well written and involves some twists and turns that do surprise, but without ever feeling forced or ‘unrealistic’ – as was sometimes the case in the mainline Yakuza series. It is difficult to go into much detail without spoiling the story (which I won’t do here), but at times it does feel like you are playing through an episode of Law and Order. Except in Japan…with an ex-yakuza sidekick…and parkour street fights.

Yagami Kaito Judgement PS5
Main character Yagami (left) and ex-Yakuza lieutenant, Kaito (right).

Yagami is assisted by a varied cast of unique characters including his ex-Yakuza sidekick Kaito, a crooked cop and the team from his former Legal firm. All of the main cast are extremely well-written and fleshed out with backstories that are drip fed to the player throughout the game. Yagami and Kaito in particular are very likable characters who have some great quality banter. Despite being a serious game with a serious plot there is plenty of humour here as well.

GAMEPLAY

The Yakuza series is known for its hard-hitting beat ’em up battle systems, and Judgement is no different. Combat is most definitely a strength of this game with Yagami having mastered two different fighting styles – the Crane style that is focussed on crowd control, and the Tiger style which is best suited for combat mano-e-mano. As usual there is no end to the number of environmental objects that can be used to your advantage, from traffic cones and trash cans to shop signs and bicycles – anything you can pick up can be smashed into your opponent’s face. Yagami is much more agile and athletic than Kiryu (the protagonist of the 6 main Yakuza games) and this allows for a fighting move-set that utilises parkour-style actions such as wall running before flinging yourself towards an opponent with a back flipping axe kick. Also returning are the ‘EX‘ finishing moves that cause devastating damage and look absolutely brutal.

Judgement PS5 PlayStation5 Combat

Personally, I played through the game on ‘Normal’ mode and did find throughout the game that the majority of fights were a little on the easy side. With the various support items available and the ability to pause the game and use them anytime it is difficult to get a ‘game over’, and even if you do the game is very generous in allowing you to retry the fight immediately. Still, the combat looks great, feels great, and doesn’t get boring as you keep unlocking new moves and actions as you gain experience.

Judgement continues the trend of what Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio has become known for with the Yakuza series: content, side quests, mini games and LOTS of them. Alongside the usual mini-game culprits in the SEGA arcade games, baseball batting cage, darts, casino games, shogi and Mahjong; Judgement provides some a couple of new flavours in 3D Drone Racing and a virtual board game. You can spend many hours getting distracted from Yagami’s quest (just like I got distracted from completing my play-through for this review) because there is so much to do here and it is all well made and fun to play.

The SEGA arcade options this time include the full arcade ports of: Fighting Vipers, Viruta Fighter 5 – Final Showdown, Puyo Puyo, Fantasy Zone, Space Harrier, Motor Raid, and ‘Kamuro of the Dead’ which is a shooting game similar to House of the Dead.

Judgement PS5 PlayStation 5 Arcade

Judgement definitely has that feeling of ‘just one more side-quest’, ‘I need to go out on one more date with Sana-Chan’, or ‘damn it I’m not turning this off until I win that last item out of the crane game’.

There are some elements to Judgement’s gameplay that are new to the series, though to me these are some of the weaker parts of the game. The majority of these are introduced early, but do not really evolve as you play through the game. First up is a ‘search mode’ where you are presented with either a crime scene or a still photo and need to find clues to progress your investigation by zooming in and highlighting the clue – not particularly exciting or engaging. There is an extension of this mode where you need to sneakily photo a suspect in a compromising position but still not really a section of the game you can look forward to.

Judgement PS5 PlayStation 5 Search Mode

Secondly there is a ‘tailing mode’ where Yagami must follow a suspect or person of interest through the streets of Kamurocho without being identified. This fares a little better than the search mode, but often just feels like the game is being slowed down or padded out. That being said, it can get your heart racing if you lose your mark and need to quickly locate them again.

Judgement PS5 PlayStation 5 Tailing Mode

Finally there is the ‘chase mode’ where Yagami must chase a person (or object) though the streets of Kamurocho. This is much more frantic than the other new modes, but really it is only a glorified quick-time-event button-press-a-thon.

Overall, the new modes do strengthen the feel of Yagami being a private detective, but there is no real challenge or even an ability to fail these sections. I do appreciate that the developers tried something a bit different, and there is certainly scope here to build on these for future games.

VISUALS

Anyone familiar with the recent Yakuza games will know what they are in for here. The ‘Dragon’ engine previously used for Yakuza 6 returns here and brings the bustling streets of Kamurocho to life. Kamurocho is designed in gorgeous detail and you can see the effort that has been put in to every aspect of the buildings, streets and neon signs of this red-light district. From the bright lights of the SEGA arcade to the gritty alley-way behind a dodgy bar, Kamurocho looks as good here as it ever has before. It really feels like you are walking the streets of busy Tokyo.

Judgement PS5 PlayStation 5 Kabukicho Kamurocho

The people you meet on your quest are also drawn with extremely life-like qualities. For me, other than Naughty Dog I think the team at Ryu Ga Gotoku had some of the best facial animations that could be found on the PS4, and these have been further enhanced to beautiful 4K60FPS visuals on the PS5.

Combat also puts the PS5 to the test with various objects and particle effects flying around. Despite this I never encountered any observable issues with frame rate dips. Throughout my time with Judgement there were never any obvious issues with the visuals that dragged me out of the experience. My only minor quip was the colour choices for some of the mini-map tracking that I found difficult to see clearly (I am partially colour blind) but it definitely wasn’t a game-breaking issue.

Being an upgraded PS4 game this isn’t going to be the best looking game available for next-gen, but it is certainly no slouch.

AUDIO

One of my favourite parts of Judgement is the original Japanese voice acting. It is stellar. Yes, you can play the game with English voice acting if you wish, and it is serviceable, but it just doesn’t bring the same gravitas. If you are playing a Yakuza game with English voice acting, just like with anime, you are doing it wrong. Personally for me the Japanese is the best option from the perspective of audio-visual engagement – because the character animations are synced up with the Japanese audio and it can look very weird with the English turned on.

Elsewhere, the ambient sounds of Kamurocho help bring the town to life. Traffic, the murmur of people as you walk past and the cacophony of noise emerging from Pachinko parlours really make you feel like you are in Tokyo.  The sound effects in combat work to pass on the severe impact when you strike your opponents (and when you are struck yourself).

The soundtrack and background music are never in your face, but help to build the tension of Yagami’s investigation and the developing story. At other times the subtle melancholic and noir-esque jazz tracks can help you relax and enjoy the city when you are not rushing to complete story based tasks.

CONCLUSION

Judgement is yet another killer entry into the Yakuza series, but it can be enjoyed alone without any prior experience required. The cast of characters are well-written and more importantly the Japanese voice acting is top-notch. The story draws you in with intrigue and never feels predictable or cliché.

Playing only the main story quests will still give you a good 20+ hour experience, but with everything you can do here there is well over 80 hours of gameplay. The amount of side content and mini-games mean there is really about five different games’ worth of entertainment here. I must have spent at least 3 hours alone playing Fantasy Zone in the SEGA arcade. If you are looking for ‘value for money’, this is a game for you.

What started in the west as a very niche Action/Adventure/Beat-em-up PS2 title has grown into a triple A series that is now moving into different genres (the RPG insanity of Like A Dragon). Judgement is not only a great place to start for new people wanting to dip a toe into the franchise, but it is an excellent standalone game that has been upgraded to take advantage of the power of the PS5. It is still worth a play on the PS4 if you aren’t one of the 5 people that own a PS5, and if you are eventually lucky enough to find one you can take advantage of the PS5 upgrade for free.

In the 24 hours before completion of this review, the news broke that the sequel to Judgement is coming VERY soon. ‘Lost Judgement‘ will release internationally on 24 September 2021. I can’t wait.

Lost Judgement PS5 PlayStation 5

So, why should you play it?

  • You are already a fan of the Yakuza series and want to experience more of the dark underworld of Kamurocho.
  • You love anything Japan.
  • As a lawyer/detective you have always wanted to knee a Yakuza in the face.
  • You enjoy procrastinating from the task at hand with darts, Drone racing or classic Sega Arcade games.

But, why shouldn’t you play it?

  • Gratuitous violence isn’t really your thing.
  • You prefer a more linear streamlined experience with no distractions.

A review code on PlayStation 5 was provided for the purpose of this review.

Resident Evil Village Review: PlayStation 5

There’s no Professor Layton here to help you in this curious village.

It’s no stretch to say that Resident Evil is videogaming’s most iconic and influential horror series. What started with humble beginnings on the PlayStation 1 in 1996 (“Jill sandwich”, anyone?) has evolved and morphed like many of the series’ grotesque enemies into a beast that has become a momentous cultural phenomenon. Boasting an extensive library of 27 separate videogames, eight main titles, numerous films (both live-action and animated), and now an upcoming Netflix TV series, Resident Evil is Capcom’s best-selling franchise and has been hugely influential in popular culture.

Resident Evil Series Compilation PlayStation
A picture I took earlier this year showcases RE games across multiple console generations.

The original game, set in the eerie Spencer Mansion, introduced the enigmatic characters, Chris Redfield and Jill Valentine, and almost single-handedly created the genre for which the series is now so well-known: “Survival Horror”. Having been over 25 years since the launch of the inaugural title, it’s no surprise that the gameplay has needed to change and adapt significantly. Fixed camera angles soon became outdated, and as of Resident Evil 4 the player was given complete control over the camera and would play through an over-the-shoulder third person view. This style of gameplay became a series staple for many years.

Resident Evil 4 Gamecube Chainsaw
Resident Evil’s over-the-shoulder camera was used for many of the series’ entries.

Fans were polarised upon the release of Resident Evil 7: Biohazard, which saw another dramatic shift in gameplay to a more immersive first-person perspective. This was the first main Resident Evil title to be experienced entirely from the view of the main character, Ethan Winters, which allowed the player to become completely absorbed, especially when playing in virtual reality.

Four years since the launch of RE7, we once again step back into the shoes of our ever unfortunate protagonist, as the franchise slowly shuffles away from its zombified roots and instead takes a bounding leap into the realm of vampires, lycans, and dark, grim fantasy in its newest entry: Resident Evil Village.

Plot

Set three years after the terrifying events of the Baker Mansion in Resident Evil 7, the incredibly-unlucky Ethan Winters is happily settling down to live out a quiet life in his gorgeous house nestled in the mountains of Europe. Having rescued the love of his life, Mia Winters, years prior from the clutches of a deadly mutagen, Ethan can finally enjoy a moment of peace with his infant daughter, Rosemary.

…or so he thought.

Resident Evil Village PS5 PlayStation 5 Mia winters Ethan Winters Home
You’re given a brief glimpse into Ethan’s peaceful life before that dream is shattered.

During a dramatic turn of events, Ethan’s life is ruined in mere moments and he finds himself abandoned on the outskirts of a mysterious village. Much to his dismay, there’s no Professor Layton to help him in this curious village. Despite the occasional puzzle, it is mostly “filled with blood and death” as one of the NPCs so appropriately describes it. In a state of disarray and dilapidation, this once humble hamlet is now overrun by hordes of lycans and horrific creatures thanks to a most mysterious figurehead whose name is whispered by each of the residents: Mother Miranda.

Resident Evil Village PS5 PlayStation 5 Mother Miranda
Ethan’s new family welcome him to the Village.

Ethan’s only hope in recovering that which he lost is to delve deep into the village, confront the terrors within, and unravel the macabre mysteries behind the mysterious Mother Miranda and her subordinates.

Gameplay

Fans of any previous Resident Evil game are likely to be thrilled with the gameplay offered in Village, as it draws inspiration from some of the series’ most popular titles. As a direct continuation, the base gameplay is most similar to that of Resident Evil 7. Through the eyes of Ethan Winters, you’ll once again be thrust into horrific locales and fend for your life in tense situations that will often require you to think on your feet.

The pacing of the game changes dramatically with each hour of gameplay – initial areas are slow-paced and allow exploration, while others will halt you and require you to stop and solve a puzzle in order to advance. In complete juxtaposition there are certain segments that quickly become frantic, involving swarms of enemies, where a split second could be the difference between Ethan’s life and death. Combat in these situations is often quite fast-paced, and the game provides an array of weapons at Ethan’s disposal to defend against the vast horrors he encounters. While the standard enemies are easily dispatched, boss fights become bullet sponges that will require you to use all weapons at your disposal.

Resident Evil Village PS5 PlayStation 5 Blood Pool Puzzle
Simple puzzles can be a nice break from running for your life.

Those who have played Resident Evil 4 (my personal favourite of the series), will be able to make some clear connections to Leon S. Kennedy’s romp through another unwelcoming village. Exploration has a feeling much like RE4, with detailed maps, sprawling village areas, secret passageways, and shortcuts scattered throughout. You’ll also need to obtain and combine key items in order to progress, many of which give off a distinct RE4 vibe and are stored in an inventory not dissimilar to the Attache Case. Enemies regularly drop items which can be collected and sold to The Duke, who is essentially Village’s version of the mysterious Merchant. By visiting The Duke’s establishment, you’ll be able to exchange currency for weapon attachments, ammunition or items that can be used during combat. The game also includes a weapon upgrade system almost identical to that of RE4.

There is plenty to be “enjoyed” with respect to the gameplay of Resident Evil Village, and I found myself most immersed when exploring the game’s narrow hallways, cramped caves, or derelict ruins. Though it does not manage to achieve the same degree of terror as Resident Evil 7 (which was truly frightening, especially when played in VR), these situations create an incredible atmosphere that will not necessarily frighten, but instead immerse the player in the game’s gripping setting.

Visuals

If the devils in the detail, as the old adage goes, then Village is truly demonic. Graphical finesse in Village far surpasses any previous game in the series and is one of the most breath-taking games available for the current console generation. When played on a large 4K screen in a dark setting, your eyes will sometimes deceive you with environmental graphics that appear close to photorealism.

Resident Evil Village PS5 PlayStation 5 Environment Graphics
Simple environments devoid of colour are completely packed with detail.

Gorgeous, intricate, gothic architecture like that of Castle Dimitrescu is a sight to behold, and offers stunning sights that will have most players pausing to appreciate the extensive detail. At times I had to remind myself I was actually playing a Resident Evil game and not something along the lines of Bloodborne, as you’d easily be mistaken from some of the screenshots below.

While you’ll have plenty of time to appreciate the detailed environments, it’s in the games most fast-paced, intense moments that you gain brief glimpses into the horrific, grotesque enemies who reside within the village. In a series that once had such a focus on zombies, enemy designs now instead seem to draw heavily upon fantasy, as if inspired by some sort of R-rated Brothers Grimm adaptation. You’ll encounter unfathomable abominations, swift and relentless lycans, and of course, Vampiresses whose thirst for Ethan’s delicious man-blood is unquenchable.

Resident Evil Village PS5 PlayStation 5 Lady Dimitrescu Claws
Not many characters have received quite as much internet attention as Lady Dimitrescu.

Audio

With sound design as detailed as its graphics, Resident Evil Village manages to replicate realistic 3D audio and attention-to-detail that will truly engross when experienced with a quality headset. At times I found myself having to guess whether a sound had occurred in the game or in real life. Eerie ambience will have you on the edge of your seat, minute audio details like creaking floorboards or a curtain flapping in the distance will alert you to threats that would be otherwise missed by your vision. This helps significantly when trying to avoid combat, as not only will the audio help the player determine the direction of an enemy, but subtle changes to sound will also help gauge distance.

A vital element of the game’s audio is in the form of voice acting, particularly from Todd Soley, who plays the voice of Ethan. Cries of agony and anguish are almost 100% believable and at times had me wincing and needing to avert my eyes during particularly confronting scenes. Ethan’s pleading for mercy or panicked screams are a brilliant and disturbing voice acting performance that undoubtedly deepens the level of horror. This is unfortunately contrasted with some of the game’s villains who have exaggerated or whacky voices, which become more comedic than horrific.

Extras

Now it wouldn’t be a Resident Evil game without some added bonuses, right?
Shooting galleries? Easter eggs? Boulder-punching competitions?

Thankfully Village provides multiple incentives to keep playing both before and after the credits roll. Throughout the game you’ll be tasked with additional optional challenges to complete, some of which will aid Ethan’s plight significantly. Much like past RE games, there are hidden breakable objects scattered throughout the village in the form of wooden “Goats of Warding” (much like the Mr Everywhere bobbleheads or Mr Raccoon toys). Additionally you’ll be able to take advantage of the game’s photo mode, which can be used at any time to pause and take in your surroundings (even if at times you’d rather not).

The strangest addition comes in the form of four “Labyrinths” to complete throughout the game – these are intricate scale-model structures created by an artist that play out like a combination of Monkey Ball and Captain Toad. You’re first tasked with finding a steel ball hidden somewhere in the village, then upon returning to the Labyrinth you can drop the ball in and guide it through the level. In completing each Labyrinth you’re rewarded with highly valuable items which can be exchanged for some serious coin. Though I can’t help but feel this was a very odd inclusion.

Resident Evil Village PS5 PlayStation 5 Labyrinth Steel Ball
Take a moment to forget about your looming death to play Super Monkey Ball.

These extras, however, pale in comparison to the most alluring additional content in Village: Mercenaries Mode, which is unlocked after completion of the main game. Initially introduced in Resident Evil 3, Mercenaries plays out like an action/time-attack in which you’re tasked with fending off a set number of enemies within a limited amount of time. Levels reuse familiar locales from the main story scattered with various enemy types, and you’ll be able to accumulate money in order to upgrade your weapons as well as gain perks that will assist in future levels. It’s fun, frantic, arcade-style gameplay that will appeal to series veterans and newcomers alike.

Resident Evil Village PS5 PlayStation 5 Mercenaries Mode
Even in minigames, poor Ethan still has such a hard time.

Conclusion

Though less terrifying when compared to its predecessor, and by no means a game that will require a change of pants, Village still offers one of the most gripping, immersive and thrilling experiences in the entire franchise. Intricate level design and captivating audio combined with smooth gameplay and gunplay create an unforgettable survival horror experience. As a direct sequel, fans of RE7 will get the most out of the game’s characters and narrative, though newcomers will easily be able to dive into the horror without feeling too lost.

With approximately 10 – 15 hours required for completion of the story, difficulty levels to suit all players, and enough detail and extra content to keep you engrossed, Resident Evil Village is an impressive foray into the newest generation of consoles and should not be dismissed by series fans or those seeking a thrill.

So, why should you play it?

  • You’ve enjoyed the gameplay any of the previous Resident Evil games, particularly 4 and 7.
  • Looking for a horror game to play on the newest generation of consoles? Village is the perfect place to start.
  • You appreciate high levels of detail and realistic graphics in games.
  • Resource management and smooth first-person gunplay appeals to you.
  • Fans of dark fantasy will be thrilled by the game’s enemies and bosses.
  • Big mommy vampire.

But why shouldn’t you play it?

  • Don’t do well with jump scares? Definitely avoid this one.
  • Seeking a game to truly traumatise and terrify? Try RE7 in VR instead.

A review code on PlayStation 5 was provided for the purpose of this review.

WCTV Podcast #4 – Hunting Season

Recently I’ve been invited to appear on WindyCornerTV’s channel to help record a podcast! Earlier this year we recorded and episode for the 10th anniversary of the Nintendo 3DS, and decided to make the podcast a regular thing!

In each episode we’ll discuss recent releases, games we played and reviewed over the last couple of weeks, and interesting topics from the games industry around the world. In this episode we discuss the biggest release of the last month: Monster Hunter Rise! Robert also dives into his experience with Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1 + 2 on the PlayStation 5, we chat about the recent VR version of DOOM 3 for the PSVR, and I discuss my time at the Hamburg Games Conference and recent review of Everhood on Nintendo Switch.

You can watch the podcast here:

Stay tuned for future episodes and be sure to check out WindyCornerTV’s channel!
In the next episode I’ll be talking about my weekend playing the Diablo II: Resurrected technical alpha.

Altdeus: Beyond Chronos Review – PSVR

The most visual of visual novels.

Have you ever read a book? You know, those compilations of physical pages that you have to manually read and turn in order to experience a linear plot? I’m going to assume you probably have.

Now, have you ever read a choose-your-own-adventure book? A book that gives you the option to make choices that dramatically affect the course of the plot. Usually it will require you to flip to a particular page where your choice causes the story to branch off in a different direction. Goosebumps books were some of the most popular. It was exhilarating to know the choices I made could make such an impact (even if it mostly resulting in my character dying).

A visual novel (VN) is the evolution of this concept – a digital version of a choose-your-own-adventure book. The visual novel is a staple of modern gaming in Japan and often features intricate plot, strong character development, and branching narratives. The genre emerged in the early ’90s thanks to the advances in computer graphics and continued to increase in popularity well into the early 2000s. Some notable titles in the genre include the tear-jerking Clannad, time-travelling banana scientist in Steins;Gate, and internet favourite dating simulator, Katawa Shojo. As a well-established genre, there are even some visual novels about dating pigeons, or ones I’ve played that I probably shouldn’t mention in public.

Above: Clannad, Steins;Gate, Katawa Shoujo.

Thanks to VR game developer studio MyDearest, who have created VR novels and manga, the visual novel has now moved one step closer to reality. In 2019 their first game Tokyo Chronos became one of the first VNs to enter VR, and was successful enough to justify a sequel. Released initially for the Oculus Quest in 2020, ALTDEUS: Beyond Chronos garnered multiple awards and received critical acclaim. Now available for the PSVR, how does this version hold up? And is it good enough that it’ll make you want to throw out all your physical novels?

Plot

The year is 2280. The world has been ravaged by interdimensional aliens called Meteroa, which obliterate all life on the surface with weaponised sound waves. Humanity has been forced to withdraw underground into their last bastion, establishing a digital Tokyo with all of its citizens connected to a server. In attempts to retaliate, a group known as Prometheus recruits pilots for its Evangelion-sized mecha. You play as Chloe, an artificial human designed for the sole purpose of operating the Makhia and defending the remnants of Tokyo from complete annihilation.

Altdeus Beyond Chronos PS4 PS5 PSVR Makhia
Remember folks, if you ever need to pilot a giant robot, be sure to bring an idol with you.

Alongside Chloe at all times is the artificial-intelligence companion, AARC Noa, a part-time pilot, part-time idol, full-time sass machine, modelled off the consciousness of her recently deceased best friend: Coco Coconoe. Though Coco has been gone for 2 years after being devoured by a Meteroa, Chloe has frequent flashbacks of their time spent together, having learned the intricacies of human emotion from their many interactions. At times it feels as if Chloe can still feel her deep connection to Coco, hearing her voice whispering from beyond. Then, only hours into your journey, a fateful encounter with a mysterious Meteroa changes everything that Chloe has been led to believe…

Altdeus Beyond Chronos PS4 PS5 PSVR  Coco
The deep bond formed between Chloe (player) and Coco (pictured) becomes highly emotive.

Arguably the most important aspect of any visual novel is its plot, and ALTDEUS delivers one that is gripping, emotional, and has heavy themes of human connection despite the game’s many artificial characters. Featuring eight separate endings, choices made during character interaction and battle sequences bear significant weight and will drastically change your outcome.

Gameplay

If you’re playing a VN for its gameplay, you’re probably doing it wrong. As I discussed at the beginning of this article, this genre is akin to an interactive story where choices influence the plot. As such, gameplay in ALTDEUS is minimal and consists mostly of dialogue, character interaction, occasional use of the Move Controllers and the odd battle sequence. It’s fairly basic gameplay and completely approachable even to complete newcomers to VR – as most of the game is static, you’re very unlikely to experience any motion-sickness at all.

Altdeus Beyond Chronos PS4 PS5 PSVR Choices
Your choices influence the story. Just like real life!

Scattered throughout the game are sequences in which you pilot the Makhia: a giant robot controlled by a “Neural Link” (your VR headset) and “Mikani Links” (your Move controllers). In connecting with the Makhia, you work alongside idol/AI Noa performing various actions to form shields, analyse the opponent, or charge and launch your rail cannon. Though each of these actions is incredibly simple to perform, your choice and timing will decide how the battle plays out. Initially I was blown away by these sequences, which feel as if you really are in the cockpit of a giant robot, but by the end of the game I had seen the same thing so many times that the novelty had worn off almost completely.

Altdeus Beyond Chronos PS4 PS5 PSVR VR
Get in the robot, S̶h̶i̶n̶j̶i̶ Chloe.

Visuals

A virtual reality game set in a virtual Tokyo should look like a virtual Tokyo, right? Right. During the game you’ll get to stand in the centre of Tokyo’s iconic Shibuya Scramble Crossing which is quite surreal; I found myself pausing momentarily to admire my surroundings in 360 degrees despite the low-resolution textures. Most other environments appear quite bland with little detail, though the clean character models with their distinct anime design will draw your attention away from this.

Sadly the game’s visuals are somewhat hindered and result in low-detail, blurry textures due to the limitations of the PSVR, as can be seen below:

Left: PSVR, Right: PC.

There are however a couple of redeeming features to the game’s visuals. Sequences inside of the giant Makhia robots are impressive and look just as anime has led you to imagine: surrounded by with HUDs, screens and warning symbols. I was also blown away by the 360 degree concerts performed by Noa throughout the game, which transport you to a virtual concert space where you are truly immersed in the visuals during her performance as she sings and dances around you. It’s hard to fully describe and must be experienced first-hand.

Altdeus Beyond Chronos PS4 PS5 PSVR 360 Idol Concert
The 360 degree idol concerts are a visual spectacle.

Audio/Soundtrack

If you’re going to read through text for 15 – 20 hours, you may as well do so accompanied by some brilliant music. ALTDEUS’ soundtrack is a collaboration between multiple musicians:
– In-house composer Yosuke Kori.
– J-pop/electro musician kz(livetune) who has composed many anime openings.
– Kunuyuki Takahashi (MONACA), who arranged tracks for NieR and NieR:Automata.
– R!N who is well-known for her powerful voice in Attack on Titan’s vocal tracks.

Many of the background tracks convey a calm, wistful, and sometimes melancholic feeling, which is often reflected in the music that plays during the game’s frequent flashbacks. I’d relate this to the music in other emotional visual novels, think Clannad. This is juxtaposed by the high-tempo, upbeat idol-style songs that are scattered throughout the game’s virtual idol performances. I was most-impressed by the incredibly immersive, 360 degree anime opening that plays in the first hour of the game, which I imagine would be similar to attending a vocaloid concert.

It’s worth noting that the vocal tracks are some of the best I’ve heard in a game and are of such quality that they deserve their own standalone album. Below are a couple of my favourite tracks from the game:

An intense battle theme during the first Meteroa fight:

One of the catchy, upbeat idol tracks that Noa sings:

While I sing the soundtrack’s praises, it’s important that the voice acting too is up to scratch, as for the vast majority of the game you’ll be listening to character dialogue. You’re given the choice between an English and Japanese dub, and me being the weeb I am, I chose the latter. Not once did I tire of hearing any of the voice-acting, which has clear delivery, believable acting and even some serious emotional weight behind it during some of the more touching moments in the game. At times it felt just as if I was watching a quality anime production thanks to the voice acting of the game.

Conclusion

Having never previously played a virtual visual novel, ALTDEUS: Beyond Chronos is a PSVR game unlike any other I’ve encountered, and one I would highly recommend for those looking for a unique VR experience. Fans of anime too are also likely to get a kick out of ALTDEUS, as it clearly draws inspiration from series like Neon Genesis Evangelion and Macross.

Altdeus Beyond Chronos PS4 PS5 PSVR Makhia
Yeah, I’d definitely skip a meeting to go see a giant robot too.

With 8 separate endings, a branching narrative, and a gripping plot, it will take you approximately 20 hours to reach the true ending which is well-worth it for those willing to commit. Admittedly some choices can be obscure and frustrating, requiring trial and error likely to put off many players. Though it could have simply been made as a normal 2D visual novel, being completely surrounded by the game enhances immersion dramatically, especially during the game’s battles and emotional interactions.

While this may be my first VR VN, having enjoyed ALTDEUS as much as I did, I highly doubt this will be my last. And it could be your first too!

So, should you play it?

  • You’re looking for a game with a gripping, emotional plot.
  • Piloting a mecha has always been your dream.
  • Are you an anime fan with a PSVR gathering dust? Time to dust it off.
  • A necessary game for fans of J-pop and idol music.

But why shouldn’t you play it?

  • Not a big fan of long dialogue sequences or cutscenes? Stay away from VNs as a whole.
  • Playing through the same sequences may frustrate those with little patience.

A PSVR review code (played on PlayStation 5) was provided for the purpose of this review.

Guilty Gear and the Importance of Rollback Netcode

Guilty Gear has seen many iterations throughout the years, most recently being the Xrd series, with each new title being a refinement of the last entry and a focus on tight, concise gameplay. Xrd and each of its new subreleases (Revelator, REV 2, and Sign) were most definitely great fighting games in their own right, that were a blast to play with a very striking art style. That being said, as much as I could laud over them for how many hours I spent labbing with every character (but mostly just Potemkin), they were missing something crucial that its sister title. Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus R received from the outset that would have been vital to Xrd’s lifespan from the very beginning. Funnily enough, this is because XXAC+R started out as a fan project, but Arc System Works actually found out about the work the team behind the game were implementing and then immediately hired them to finish the project and Aksys would release it as an official Guilty Gear game, which is a story that deserves an article of its own. But what is this crucial element that XXAC+R received that Xrd did not? The excellent addition of Rollback Netcode implementation. For the readers who do not know, allow me to give a brief explanation of Rollback Netcode and why it is what I would consider to be a crucial component in the longevity, or one might even say survival, of fighting games in general.

The normal Netcode that most multiplayer and fighting games use that the average consumer is aware of is delay-based. It is the most well-known and widespread, but hang around those who have been in the Fighting Game Community for any length of consistent time and you will hear the hushed whispers of those who wish their favorite games ditched the dinosaur delay-based tyranny for smooth, tight Rollback. You see, fighting games are used to process both player inputs at the same time, however when your online opponent’s inputs are received they need to be sent over the network to be displayed to you on your side of the match, they will inevitably be delayed as a result. Thereby the game needs a method to deal with these late inputs to make it seem as close as possible that said opponent is playing locally right next to you, fitestick or pad in hand. Delay-based is the most common way to deal with this, so what does it do?

What is Delay-Based Netcode?

Simply put, Delay-Based Netcode delays the local player’s (in this case you) inputs by the necessary number of frames to match accordingly with their online opponent. It makes your inputs slower so the fight seems closer to local play. If you input a low punch that takes three animation frames offline, it would make that punch come out in six frames instead of three, that way the three extra frames could be used to process your opponent’s inputs and be sent to you via the network and would match accordingly. As a result of the delay, your input timing and reactions will drastically differ online, making the timing you have gotten so used to during the mix-ups and combos you have practiced near completely irrelevant. No match will feel the way you want it to, and that isn’t even counting internet spikes or connection issues. Consistency is the end all be all word us FGC freaks love. Consistency in how something feels, and how it plays. So, what exactly can we do to make consistent online matches to where you, the local player, aren’t being delayed by near DOUBLE your framedata to match your opponent?

What is Rollback Netcode?

Enter sweet baby Rollback. So what does it do since the frames can never perfectly match up for a local and online player since no matter how good your connection is, they are not right next to you? Simply put, it does not delay you at all. The local player’s inputs aren’t delayed whatsoever, and they are transmitted online as if they were being put in offline. Instead, it simply rolls back (hence the name) time itself ala King Crimson style your online opponent’s inputs to match their frames up consistently with yours. It fixes the mistakes of the frame delay by correcting the past on your screen. Yes, it’s as good as it sounds. When those inputs are missing initially, the player will have gone through time when your player pressed that button or did that action, and the game you are playing would have shown a different result on screen, and the way Rollback fixes this, is it rewinds the simulation how it played out in the netcode’s head and fixes it, applying your opponent’s input and displaying it to you immediately. Your three-frame low punch we were talking about earlier that gets delayed to six frames to match? Instead, now your opponent’s input is being rolled back to reach three frames earlier. Simply put, it’s fucking Godlike consistency in comparison to Delay-Based.

So then the question becomes, why is Delay-Based Netcode still used? Honestly, the main reason is how much more effort it takes to implement proper Rollback for development teams, is not worth the effort and extra money and time publishers are willing to throw at it, and close to half of Japanese publishers do not know the difference between them. For fighting games as a whole, the big heads of the staple franchises like Capcom and SNK, are convinced that the fans will happily accept the worst delay-based they could possibly fit inside the game, and for the most part, they are right. SFV has sold roughly 4.5 million copies as of me writing this, and yet still the Netcode is still notoriously broken. How does all of this information relate to Strive? I’ll inform you of why. Arc System Works announced from day one that they were using Rollback for Strive, and when the beta was dropped, to say that there was hardly any downtime waiting for matches and every match was fantastic with no disconnects nor delay spikes would be an understatement.

The Hype Is Real

Guilty Gear Strive is not only a fantastic fighting game from what I have played of the Beta, but it is vitally important for fighting games and the future of Netcode. There has been an absolutely monumental roar from fans about how smooth it is and how much they want more of this same online experience for different future titles from other developers. So much so that Arc System Works has talked about going back and adding Rollback into previous Guilty Gear titles! Guilty Gear Strive still brings us the many characters fans have come to know and love throughout the years such as Sol Badguy, Ky Kisuke, Chipp, Baiken, Faust, May, and my boy, the armor clad of faith himself Potemkin. It also brings us an absolutely flooring OST released so far including Smell of the Game and Society, but most importantly, it will bring us, the players, the freedom of being uncaged by the prison of horrid online match-ups. I could go on and on about the new and old mechanics introduced to the game such as wall-breaks, Roman Cancels, and Faultless Defense, but there will be another time in the near future when that will happen, and I’ll have plenty to say then around June.

The hype for Strive is real, everyone, for anyone who loves fighting games or this community as much as I do, I can’t recommend you get on this quick enough. Feel the difference in online matchmaking and what it should be for a fighting game made by people who care about the experience of the people who play it and convey that passion for their work through every frame of animation and every pixel and particle effect off each character. As of June 11th, 2021, if you have a stick gathering dust in the peripheral closet, blow it off and break it out, because hundreds of thousands are going to collide, because they already know the Smell of the Game. I’ll catch you all in the lobbies.

Find out more about Guilty Gear Strive at the official website: https://www.guiltygear.com/ggst/en/

Rez Infinite Review – PS4/PS5

Take a trip through the infinite to experience true synaesthesia.

As most PlayStation 4 and 5 owners will (hopefully) be aware – Sony are encouraging people to do the right thing during the COVID-19 global pandemic by giving out a stack of 11 free games to motivate people around the world to stay safe by staying at home. The best part of this deal is that you don’t even need to be a PlayStation Plus subscriber to take advantage of this generous offer. Amazingly, as long as you add the games to your library while the offer is up, the games will be remain available for you permanently to download and play at any time in the future.

By the time you are reading this you have likely missed out on the first available game, Ratchet and Clank 2016, as this was only available to 31 March 2021. But this is your warning to get off your arse and go add the current batch of 9 games to your library RIGHT NOW…so you can sit back down on your arse to get in some quality gaming. Even if you don’t currently have access to a PSVR headset, there is literally no reason to not add the VR only games including the first appearance of the lovable PS5 mascot Astro Bot in Astro Bot Rescue Mission (a great game in its own right).

In addition to the aforementioned Ratchet and Clank 2016 there are some absolute winners here in Sony’s offering that deserve your attention. The survival indie classic Subnautica, atmospheric mystery/puzzler The Witness and bullet-hell rouge-like dungeon-crawler Enter the Gungeon are all high-quality games that have scored well with both critics and player communities alike. Even more crazily, from 19 April 2021 the game-of-the-generation contender Horizon Zero Dawn will also be FREE to download – and that is the ‘Complete Edition’ with additional DLC included!

But what I’m here today to tell you is that there is a better game on the free list. A game that in my mind is an outright classic across the entire history of video games. Yes, a game that is better than Ratchet and Clank, better than Subnautica and BETTER THAN HORIZON ZERO DAWN (I said it)- and that game is Rez Infinite.

Play at Home 2021 update: 10 free games to download this Spring
It is the first game on the list. Sony knows what’s up.

I should clarify that Rez Infinite is not the type of game that everyone will enjoy. The ‘on-rails shooter’ genre died out a long time ago as technology passed it by. But Rez it is a truly unique gaming experience that makes the most of the human senses of sight, hearing and touch to invite the player to enter the trance-like state known as ‘flow’ more than anything else this lifelong gamer has had the pleasure of playing.

Rez was originally released on the Sega Dreamcast and PS2 in Japan in November 2001, with western releases following on those consoles through early 2002. The original game saw an HD remaster release in January 2008 that was only available on the Xbox 360.

The version now available as part of the Play at Home package is the fully updated PlayStation 4 release ‘Rez Infinite’, which includes full PlayStation VR compatibility and a whole new game area created specifically for the Rez Infinite version that provides a whole new way of playing the game while also making the most of current technology of Unreal Engine 4. Unfortunately, I don’t have access to PSVR (or Oculus, where Rez Infinite is also playable) so I can’t provide comment on that mode of play. But I can say that when I do eventually enter the VR world, Rez Infinite will be the first thing I play.

PLOT

The plot of Rez is as bare bones as you can get. Set in the near future, an online network known as “K Project” is created to manage the massive amounts of data through the power of an AI called Eden. As you might guess, the AI is unable to understand the evil and corruption of the human race and begins to doubt its purpose and existence. Rather than going all Skynet, Eden escapes to the depths of cyberspace and shuts down. You play as a hacker attempting to ‘rescue’ Eden from digital infection (viruses) and wake her to fulfil her role in helping humanity.

…Lets be honest, you aren’t playing Rez for the Plot.

What does it want? To stop you moving forward. Why? I dunno…

GAMEPLAY

The simple controls of Rez have not been changed over the past 20 years. The left stick moves the small targeting reticule around the screen, when over your target you press X to shoot a single shot, or hold X to charge up to 8 shots across up to 8 separate targets. All shots ‘home’ in on your enemies or powerups, but don’t think that makes the game easy. This system comes with an inbuilt risk/reward play style. If you always try and charge to the maximum 8 shots then you might not have time to get another shot out to hit that newly spawned projectile coming your way. However, the process of charging is much faster than mashing out 8 individual shots, especially for the enemies that take multiple hits – some more than 8.

Locked on and charging up.

Through each level you may be lucky enough to pick up ‘Overdrive’ charges. Overdrive charges are your typical ‘bomb’ attack that will take out everything on the screen for about 5 seconds. You can hold up to 4 Overdrive charges at once, and there are some sections of the game where you will absolutely need these if you want to avoid taking a hit.

Old-school controls come with old school difficulty. There are no gameplay difficulty settings available here to make things easier for you. Starting from Area 1 your avatar will be level 1, meaning you can take a maximum of two hits. As you play through the game and shoot down your enemies, they will occasionally drop ‘progress nodes’. Collecting 8 progress nodes will allow your avatar to level up to a maximum of level 5, with each level allowing you to take another hit before dying.

Sometimes the enemy itself is the least of your problems.

There are 5 Areas in the base game each with its own unique boss. Each boss battle actually comes in three difficulty levels (Mega, Giga and Tera) which are based on your performance though the Area – the game adjusts somewhat to your skill level in terms of boss difficulty, though the easier ‘Mega’ bosses can still pack a punch. The Bosses are definitely a highlight of the game and challenge you while never feeling unfair.

Area 1 boss battle. Form of: psychedelic disco octopus.

On completion of the base game and reaching specific score ratings, you will unlock additional game modes such as boss rush and score attack. It will take new players, particularly those new to this sub-genre of games, multiple attempts to even finish the areas beyond Area 1, and even longer to get ‘100%’ completion ratings. At its core, like any shooter, Rez is an exercise in pattern recognition, memory, and visual awareness. The more you play the better you get, and the more of this magnificent title you get to experience.

The addition of ‘Area X’ to the PlayStation 4 version provides a new way to play Rez. Not only are the visuals and audio massively upgraded (even beyond the HD update), but you are no longer confined to the one-directional ‘on-rails’ control scheme, and can now rotate in full 360 degrees. There was clearly a lot of love put into the latest update to the team, and Area X almost feels like a sequel in terms of quality.

VISUALS/DESIGN/SOUND

THIS is where Rez truly shines. For this title it is impossible to separate visuals, design and sound due to the way they are so intricately intertwined. Furthermore, every element of the gameplay builds upon the core focus the game – to immerse you in the sights and sounds of Rez.

At the start of each Area the soundtrack, sound effects and visuals are minimal. As you progress each button you press, each shot that you fire and each enemy that you destroy builds upon the soundscape and atmosphere. Each Area contains 10 sections known as ‘Layers’. Cracking each progressive layer of security will further enhance the sound and visual experience of the Area, always for the better.

Unlocking the next layer, unlocking the beats.

What starts as the occasional snare drum hit and synth chord evolves as you play into a full-blown tune. And I mean TUNE. New instruments can be added to the soundtrack, the additional sounds you trigger when shooting enemies will change and the wire-frame visuals will twist and morph from simple lines into pulsating pyramids, forests and temples. All of the tracks are electronic music and that might not be your jam. But if you like a lick of EDM, a dash of Drum and Bass, or a sliver of psy-trance – this game is for you.

I find myself uncontrollably becoming a member of the Night at the Roxbury crew so often when playing Rez that I fear I will wake up the next day needing a solid physiotherapy session.

See the source image


Each of the core game’s 5 Areas and Area X contain a discrete audio-visual experience. Effectively giving you the feeling that you are inside a computer. Think along the lines of Tron…has anybody seen the movie Tron?

The pure sense of synaesthesia is most apparent the in the original Rez’s breathtaking final Area. It is one of my favourite levels in all of video games and it deserves to be preserved in an art gallery for future generations.

CONCLUSION

Rez Infinite is not a new game. It is a remastered version of a game from 20 years ago that was pretty much the swansong of its genre.

It is a niche retro experience that in all honesty is not for everyone. It can, at times, be brutally difficult. But if you enjoy a great shooter, if you are an audio-visual buff, or if anything said above piques your interest in the slightest, I urge you to give Rez Infinite a try.

Rez Infinite is simply the pinnacle of the rail shooter genre.

So, why should you play it?

  • Electronic music is your thing
  • You want to experience unmatched audio-visual synaesthesia
  • Um, its FREE

But, why shouldn’t you play it?

  •  …uh, maybe if you don’t own (or have access to) a PS4 or PS5

People, its FREE.

The current Play at Home selection of 9 games, including Rez Infinite, will be free right through to 22 April 2021, so what the hell are you waiting for?!

Note: I own this game on PS2 and I also paid for the Rez Infinite version loooong before the Play at Home games were announced.

Oddworld: Soulstorm Collector’s Odditions Available for Pre-Order

Microids and Oddworld Inhabitants have unveiled the retail editions of Oddworld: Soulstorm.

The PlayStation®5 and PlayStation®4 physical editions of Oddworld: Soulstorm will be available at retailers on July 6. Pre-orders for the Day One Oddition and Collector’s Oddition are now open at participating retailers.

A selection of retailers will offer a set of exclusive digital content, available through download codes for every preorder.

Here is the list of preorder bonuses:

  • Oddworld: Soulstorm’s Original Soundtrack: listen to Oddworld: Soulstorm’s epic & atmospheric soundtrack.
  • Digital Oddworld Artbook: discover the dark world of Oddworld and its unique art style!
Odwworld Soulstorm PS4 PS5 Pre-Order Bonuses
Pre-order bonuses include a digital soundtrack and artbook.

Discover the Day One and Collector Oddition’s content, both available on July 6 on PS5 and PS4!

Odwworld Soulstorm Collector's Edition Oddition Day One Steelbook PS4 PS5 Pre-Order Bonuses
Includes a snazzy steelbook. Everyone loves a steelbook.

The Day One Oddition will feature the game in a collectible metal case.

Odwworld Soulstorm Collector's Edition Oddition Day One Steelbook Abe Figure Artbook PS4 PS5 Pre-Order Bonuses
Wouldn’t you just love having a little Abe creeping around your house?

The Collector’s Oddition consists of:

  • A Unique Collector’s Box
  • Oddworld: Soulstorm’s standard edition for PlayStation 4 or PlayStation 5
  • A collectible metal case
  • An exclusive 22cm figurine of Abe, Mudokon hero
  • A premium 160-page artbook by Pix’n Love Publishing
  • An exclusive Mining Company keychain
  • Three art prints
  • Ancient Mudokon Tribal stickers
  • Abe’s hand tattoo

About Oddworld: Soulstorm

Oddworld: Soulstorm is the bigger, badder, bolder action-adventure platforming sequel to the renowned video game series, and the explosive second installment in the quintology. You play as Abe, the reluctant Mudokon hero whose actions sparked an uprising and now must lead his fellow Mudokons in their fight for freedom against the Magog Cartel and the planet’s ruling power.

Abe will struggle for survival against the planet’s ruling and well-funded power. They are armed with all means of oppression, from propaganda to biological to ruthless deadly force.

Explore massive cinematic scale and 2.9D environments filled with breathtaking visuals. Scavenge for supplies, craft weapons, arm your followers, solve puzzles, and attempt to safely deliver all of Abe’s 1,000+ followers to freedom.

Once pre-orders are live I’ll be updating this post with the links.
PS4 Collector’s Edition at EB: https://www.ebgames.com.au/product/ps4/266680-oddworld-soulstorm-collectors-edition
PS5 Collector’s Edition at EB: https://www.ebgames.com.au/product/ps5/267010-oddworld-soulstorm-collectors-edition
PS4 Day One Edition at EB: https://www.ebgames.com.au/product/ps4/266679-oddworld-soulstorm-day-one-edition
PS5 Day One Edition at EB: https://www.ebgames.com.au/product/ps5/267009-oddworld-soulstorm-day-one-edition
PS5 Collector’s Edition at JB: https://www.jbhifi.com.au/products/playstation-5-oddworld-soulstorm-collectors-oddition?queryID=611ce842543192454aca888e5c6f3a63&objectID=517347
PS4 Collector’s Edition at JB: https://www.jbhifi.com.au/products/playstation-4-oddworld-soulstorm-collectors-oddition?queryID=611ce842543192454aca888e5c6f3a63&objectID=517348
PS4 Day One Edition at JB: https://www.jbhifi.com.au/products/playstation-4-oddworld-soulstorm-day-one-oddition?queryID=611ce842543192454aca888e5c6f3a63&objectID=517350
PS5 Day One Edition at JB: https://www.jbhifi.com.au/products/playstation-5-oddworld-soulstorm-day-one-oddition?queryID=611ce842543192454aca888e5c6f3a63&objectID=517349